Designing for Noro Yarns has that inescapable element of fun and my Fluted Scarf published in the Latest Noro Magazine (Issue 6) illustrates just that.

I think most, if not all, knitters agree that Noro’s limitless range and ambitious composition of color is the sweet force drawing us into their dreamy web.

 

About This Design:

Fluted Scarf by Halleh Tehranifar Noro Knitting Magazine Spring/ Summer 2015, photo by Jack Deutsch

Fluted Scarf by Halleh Tehranifar
Noro Knitting Magazine Spring/ Summer 2015, photo by Jack Deutsch

Defining Words: Vibrant, Polished, Texturized

Yarn: Noro Taiyo (Worsted, 40% Cotton/30% Silk/15% Wool/15% Nylon, 220yds, 201m/ 3.5oz ,100g)

Color #28: 3 skeins

Sizes: 8.5″ x 68″/ 21.5 x 172.5 cm

 

The scarf is featured on page 34-35 launching the storyline of “On Trend In Style”. This is a substantial scarf that can be worn around the shoulders as a light wrap or used as a scarf in various forms.


The wavy bobble-trimmed lacy end panels give way to highly texturized center rib pattern. As the final bit of detail, the beloved I-cord embraces the side edges. The finished work is substantial, yet airy and intricate with great drape and popping vertical and horizontal stripes in luscious colors running through it.

Fluted Scarf by Halleh Tehranifar Noro Knitting Magazine Spring/ Summer 2015, photo by Jack Deutsch Tehranifar

Fluted Scarf by Halleh Tehranifar
Noro Knitting Magazine Spring/ Summer 2015, photo by Jack Deutsch Tehranifar

There are two halves and –don’t panic– really four steps to this pattern:

 

  • End Panels (2) in a pretty combination of lacy eyelets and bobbles on a backdrop of stockinette and garter stitches are knitted first.
  • Center/Body Panels (2) for which the stitches are picked up along the straight edge of each end panel. They are worked in a broken rib pattern vertically.
  • The completed two halves are joined via 3-needle bind-off at center back neck.
  • Self attaching I-cord edging is worked on each vertical side.

 

 


I admit this is not a pattern for those who prefer to cast-on and bind-off once and be done. But I also will point out that each step on its own is not overly hard nor long. And the working the ribbed center panels is deliciously swift.

As a final note; one could easily make this pattern into a wrap by widening end panels and consequently picking up more stitches for the center panels.

As always, please remember to visit the design page on Ravelry and “heart” it if you could.

© 2015, livingamused. All rights reserved.

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